Riding off into the sunset …

cowboy sunset 
 
 
 
 
 
 … on a lame horse.

George Bush’s presidency presumably will limp to its conclusion, now that the Democrats control both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

I can’t help gloating a little. Most Canadians despise the Bush administration. Most Europeans, too. Most of the world, actually.

Here’s an excerpt from Bill Maher’s appearance on Larry King Live last night (referring to George Allen, who lost his bid for the Senate in the state of Virginia):

Bill MaherGeorge Allen is not a bright man. He’s very much like President Bush. If he goes down [to defeat] I think it’s symbolic — to me, anyway — that that type of politics may have seen its better days.

The politics of an empty suit who we get to run because he’s the son of somebody famous; and he’s a guy we’d like to have a beer with; and he’s from the south; and he’s got crap on his shoes; and he wears a cowboy hat.

You know, all that stuff that was charming about George Bush is not so charming any more. And George Allen to me represented that sort of politics. He thought he was going to be the next George Bush.

Oh yes, I almost forgot!

Goodbye Rummy / Goodbye Rummy / Goodbye Rummy / So glad to see you go!

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5 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. reportcard
    Nov 09, 2006 @ 22:56:48

    Any comment on your boy Bill Maher’s threat to out gay Republicans on his show Friday. It came during the same Larry King Live interview. Liberal’s better stop picking on homosexuals in the States, or they’ll find themselves without part of their base support.

    Reply

  2. Stephen
    Nov 10, 2006 @ 08:23:52

    In eighteen months of blogging, this is the first time I’ve mentioned Maher, so I doubt that he’s my boy.

    Here, he has a legitimate point. There are lots of reasons why Bush was chosen over Kerry, but one of them was, Who would you rather have a beer with?

    I think outing gays is wrong, in general. But if you have a closeted gay leader with political clout who actively campaigns against gays, he himself has turned it into a public issue.

    Maher said he would name only Republicans who have already been named. But is he justified in doing so? — I don’t follow American politics closely enough to have an informed opinion.

    One small tidbit of information. I saw that part of Larry King’s show twice. The first time, Maher actually named one person. But they edited the name out of the rebroadcast. CNN covering its ass, I guess.

    Reply

  3. 49erDweet
    Nov 10, 2006 @ 10:28:28

    Stephen, if you’ve read me recently you know by now how I feel about GWB and the election. Not happy, not sad. Resigned. Given the choice we had in 04 for the WH we did the best we could with what the parties offered up. Goes to the weakness of and in our parties, more than anything else. (I couldn’t wish Kerry on even the French) (smile).

    Maher is an interesting person. Bright. Articulate. Smug. IMHO In the end he’s too one-dimensional to end up counting for much. He’s excellent at ripping things apart, but lacks the cohesiveness it takes to be an honest commentator or buiilder.

    I suppose I’m in the same situation vis-a-vis US politics that you and bill are with CAs. Waiting.

    Cheers

    Reply

  4. Stephen
    Nov 10, 2006 @ 10:50:13

    No disagreement on any of your points, 49er. I understand why Americans turned thumbs down on Kerry, even if the alternative was GWB. As for Maher — smug? — indubitably!

    From a long-term perspective, I think it was good for the Democrats that they lost the last presidential election. If Kerry had won it, he wouldn’t have been able to fix the mess in Iraq (because no one can fix it). The Republicans would now be crowing that Iraq is Kerry’s mess; that if they had been re-elected the war would have gone better. And there would be no way to evade that criticism: the Democrats would have to share the blame for Iraq.

    Because Kerry lost, Iraq is 100% the responsibility of the Bush administration. May he wear it as Rumsfeld now wears it: slinking away in permanent disgrace.

    Reply

  5. 49erDweet
    Nov 11, 2006 @ 17:28:53

    Yeah, I’m not bitter about it. I always enjoyed Rummy’s news conferences. Its truly exhilerating to watch a great intellect in action. And he really did a good job parsing our vast military machine into a more modern and workable format. That said, even he knew he should have stepped down post 04. But I think loyalty to GWB blinded him to what would be best for the nation. And so he leaves now, in public disgrace.

    I truly think history will not rate him so low as the rest of your world seems now to do. But then we would all have to wait a couple of generations to find out, won’t we? Hopefully I’ll tarry that long.

    Cheers

    Reply

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